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COLLEGE 



W 



AEW3L 



Vol. 4. No. 29. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1905. 



Price, 5 Cents 



THE STUDIO RECEPTION. 

When we stop, sometimes, after two or 
three years at college, to look back over 
all the things that have come to constitute 
for lis the essential characteristics of this 
life, we find that a few events stand out 
with marked distinctness, as if, in some 
way, they summed up the ideals of college 
days. Among these best-remembered 
pleasures, the "Studio Reception" fills a 
place almost unique; for it means not sim- 
ply a good time, nor yet a time of mere 
academic achievement, but a moment in 
which we catch a glimpse of that success 
which has advanced so far as to eliminate 
the signs of effort, and to leave instead 
something of the perfection of a completed 
result. We feel here that study has 
reached the point of beauty, the point at 
which it has become a pleasure-giving art. 

year the pictures pre; 
selected from some one period or school 
of painting, and this year it was the Eng- 
lish school, from the time of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds down to the day of Rossctti : 
though, in fact, only one Pre-Raphaelite 
picture was given, owing to the peculiar 
difficulties that arose in regard to the use 
of color. 

The reception opened with Romney's 
portrait of "Emma, Lady Hamilton," and a 
better picture could hardly have been 
found to welcome the expectant audience. 
In a moment this charming lady had won 
our interest and sympathy, as she sat 
there so quietly musing, her chin resting 
on one hand, and her eyes thoughtful under 
the shade of the picturesque, big, blue hat. 

Then in contrast followed the figure of 
Dante, a detail from "Dante's Dream." The 
extremely difficult pose was well arranged, 
even to the expressive hands, and main- 
tained with really surprising firmness. 
It seemed, however, as if the light wen- a 
trifle too strong on the face; and there was 
bound to be a sense of disappointment at 
a Dante whose features were so entirely 
different from what they are always shown 
to be. 

The model for "Mrs. Siddons" was, on the 
other hand, remarkably suited for the 
part, both in feature and in the general air 
of figure and pose. In this picture, we 
became thoroughly aware of the finely 
discriminating use of color that was so 
delightful in many other cases. The dull 
striped silk, the draperies of old blue and 
brown, the delicate shades of the muff and 
the soft grays of the hair — all this combi- 
nation was arranged with great apprecia- 
tive skill. The only defect was in the light- 
ing of the hat, which, at a little distance 
from the stage, was hardly distinguishable 
from the background. 



The group which followed this Gains- 
borough, gave us some of the most inter- 
esting work of the evening. There was 
marked distinction in the bearing of the 
"Ladies Waldegrave" — an easy graceful- 
ness in one, a kind of severity in the second, 
and an unassuming absorption in the 
third. And when we remember that there 
was practically no color, that everything 
depended upon pose and chiaroscuro, we 
feel all the greater admiration for this 
picture. 

Very appealing in her simplicity was the 
little "Queen Charlotte" who came next. 
Here, again, there was no color; but the 
soft folds of white in her dress and cap 
were most effectively shaded, and the light 
on the hair added a very effective touch. 

More splendid vise of color — this time 
of red; a brocaded coat, with draperies of 
solid color combined with lustrous white 
satin; very firm posing; and some delicate 
shading, particularly on the left side of the 
figure; these characterized the Reynolds' 
"George, Third Duke of Marlborough." 

But at no time in the evening was there 
more nearly perfect work than in the pre- 
sentation of "Lady Lyndhurst." The po- 
sition was most sympathetically taken, 
the tone of the satin bodice was beautifully 
rich, and the lighting was no less than 
wonderful — on the face, among all the 
flutings of the dainty white cap, and most 
markedly in the sheen of the blue satin 
sleeve, below which the hand showed just 
a little, with picture-like naturalness. 

Last of all, and unsurpassed for pure 
beauty, came Reynolds' "Justice." The 
lights and shades playing upon the curious 
tone of red, the dark hair, the strong, fine 
face, and the perfect grace of the whole 
left arm. from shoulder to wrist, as it was 
raised to hold the balance — these excel- 
lencies made the picture exceedingly fine 
in itself, and a most satisfying close of the 
evening. Such work as we saw Saturday 
night means much to us as a college, and 
we may well thank the girls through whose 
efforts it was offered for our enioyment. 
M. L. J., 1905. 



THE CHOIR CONCERT. 

On Monday evening, May fifteenth, the 
College Choir gave its first concert in 
Billings' Hall, when they sang Henry 
Smart's "King Rene's Daughter." Every- 
thing seemed rightly suited, the piece to 
the chorus, the chorus to the hall, and the 
skilful accompaniments to both. There 
were many solo numbers and most were 
well sung. In spite of her apparent 
hoarseness, Miss Nevin sang the Io^anthe 
parts exceptionally well; the "White or 



Red?" recitative and air, was very charm- 
ing, indeed. Miss Gibbs' work in her solo 
and part-song numbers was well done; she, 
too, seemed to be suffering from hoarse- 
ness ; but still she managed her many num- 
bers with her usual ease. Some of the 
other solo numbers, quartette and duet, 
were a little unevenly balanced, but the 
greater part of them were gracefully and 
easily given and discovered to us many 
soloists of ability. 

The chorus work showed good training 
and hard work. Sometimes the parts 
were weak and the volume not as good 
as the choir can give, but the interpreta- 
tion of all the chorus numbers was careful 
and the harmony good. In "Sweet the 
Angelus is Ringing," and the final march, 
the chorus did its best work. 

The accompaniments were the delight 
of the audience; the combination of piano 
and organ was most pleasing, and when the 
flute, violin and horn parts were so skil- 
fully added by Professor MacDougall, it 
seemed almost as if an orchestra were hid- 
den somewhere in the organ. Professor 
Hamilton's piano accompaniments were, 
as usual, of a high artistic order, and fur- 
nished the firm groundwork of the whole. 
If this is the "first concert" we are led to 
think that a precedent has been established 
and that we may look for more; and this 
we do with great pleasure 

The program was as follows: 
Overture, pianoforte (four hands and or- 
gan. 
Chorus, "Valley of Summer Flowers." 
Trio and Chorus. "See how gay." 
Solos by Misses Chandler, Gibbs, Darling 

and Daniels. 
Duo and Chorus, "There is a fair Maid." 

Solos by Misses Wheeler and Pinkham. 
Recitative and Arietta, "From her Bow'r." 

Miss Gibbs. 
Quartette, "Who hath seen the Trouba- 
dour? " 
Misses Williams, Gibbs, Gallup and Camp. 
Sccna and Chorus, "The Spell has 
Wrought." 

Solos by Misses Gibbs and Pinkham. 
Recitative and Air, "White or Red?" 

Miss Nevin. 
Recitative, "What Magic in a Minstrel's 
Song." 

Misses Gibbs and Daniels. 
Trio and Chorus ," Now Amulet and Spell . ' ' 
Solos by Misses Pinkham, Gibbs and 

Nevin. ■ 

Duet and Chorus, "Sweet the Angelus is 
Ringing." 
Solos by Misses Legg and Gallup. 
Recitative and Chorus, "Oh ! What a Dawn." 

Solo by Miss Chandler. 
Finale, March, "Rene, the King." O. A. S. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 

Press or N. A. lindsiy a. Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents a 
year to resident subscribers ; $1.00 per year to non- 
resident subscribers. 

All advertising communications should be sent to 
Miss C. W. Rogers, Wellesley Inn, Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
HELEN R. NORTON, Business Manager College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Elizabeth 
Camp. 



Editor-in-Chief, Marie J. Warren, 1907 

Associate Editor, Mary McDougall, 1907 

Literart Editors, 

Clara A. Griffin, 1907 Marian Bruner, 1907 

Alumna Editor, Roxana H. Vivian, 1894 

Managing Editors, 

Helen R. Norton, 1905 Elizabeth Camp, 1905 

J. Gertrude Francis, 1906 

"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 



NEW SPRING NOVELTIES 
IN JEWELRY. 

Belt Buckles, 

Hat Pins, 

CUaist Sets. 

Let us show you our New Hat Pin Holder 
for the dressing table. 

41 Summer St. 

Next Door Hovey's 

BOSTON. 




The announcement,, made in chapel 
Saturday morning, of Mr. Carnegie's gift 
to Wellesley of one hundred twenty-rive 
thousand dollars for a college library, 
brought to the members of the college 
something more than joy in this making 
possible of our longed-for and much needed 
Library Building. It brought to each 
one of us a personal responsibility in se- 
curing the prompt materialization of the 
gift. For at present, it is only a promise- 
that this sum will be put into the hands 
of the trustees of Wellesley when a new 
endownment of an equal amount shall have 
been raised to offset it. 

The privilege is ours, then, to help, in as 
much as in us lies, to secure this endow- 
ment, and it must be the pride of every 
student now in college, as well as every 
alumna, thus to make this gift of the new 
library in some little part her own. In 
the Registrar's office, may be obtained 
blanks like the following: 

Wellesley College 
Wellesley, Mass 

Class of 

Inasmuch as Mr. Andrew Carnegie 
has offered Wellesley College $125,000 
for a Library Building when the College 
secures the same amount in new endowment 
for College purposes, 

I promise to pay 

to Wellesley College on or before June 27th 
to be applied to this endowment. 

Signed, 



It's a F OWNES' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



Wholesale and Retaij 



Unless otherwise specified, contributions 
to this fund will go to the Alice Freeman 
Palmer Memorial Endownment, thus serv- 
ing a double purpose of good to the College. 
One generous pledge of ten thousand dol- 
lars has already been received. Of course, 
however much we may wish it, we have not 
the power to swell the fund by gifts so large 
as this, but it is the little things that are 
going to count. How much can we girls 
accomplish in this work for our College? 
Can not each one of us make it a mat- 
ter of personal interest and responsibility 
to assume whatever share is possible for 
us in the raising of the required endow- 
ment, so that the Library Building may 
soon be ours to use — the gift of the Welles- 
ley girls as well as that of Mr. Carnegie. 



DR. DYS' 

Sachets de Toilette, 

5eve Dermale 

AND 

Dysaline Cream 

are used by every young girl who wishes to retain 
her young looks and by every woman who wishes to 
regain her youthful appearance and eradicate wrin- 
kles. 

There are seven different kinds of Sachets, so that 
the different complexions can be treated in the man- 
ner best suited to each. 

Dr. Dys has published a book, " Plus que Belle," 
treating of feminine aesthetics and revealing secrets 
for youth and beauty, which will be sent free on re- 
quest. 

V. DARSY, 

8 EAST aOth STREET, SUITE "W. 
NEW YORK. 



NOTICE. 

Copy for the College News should be 
in the hands of the editors by Friday noon 
of each week. It is desirable that all 
communications be written in ink rather 
than in pencil. The various departments 
of the paper have been assigned to the 
supervision of different editors as follows: 

College Calendar } Mai T McDougall 

Athletic Notes f 

Society Notes r Clara A. Griffin. 

Free Press J 

Parliament of Fools'! 

Literary Notes J- Marian Bruner. 

Art Notes ) 

Alumna? Notes, Miss Vivian. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

157 Tremont St., Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of all Kinds, 

Waists and Furs. 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



J. TA1LBY <& SON, 

FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opposite R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. 

Connected by Telephone 



JOSEPH Q. LOWELL 



OSMON C. BAILEY 



LOWELL BROS. & BAILEY, 

General Commission Merchants 
and Wholesale Dealers in 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits 

and Produce of All Kinds. 

73 and 75 Clinton Street, Boston 
Ref.: Fourth Nat. Bk.. Boston Fruit & Produce Ex 



WELLESLEY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

BLOSSOri 5TREET. 

All kinds of tancy Ironing at reasonable 
prices. Collections made Monday and Tues- 
day; deliveries, Thursday and Saturday. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



3 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



May 24, 4.20 P.M., Billings Hall, recital by the students of the 
Music Department. 

May 25, 7.30 P.M., College Hall Chapel, regular mid-week prayer 
meeting of the Christian Association. 

May 26, 4.15 P.M., Billings Hall, reading of "Candida" by Miss 
Chamberlain. 

May 27, 1.30 P.M., Room K, lecture by Mr. Robert A. Woods. 

May 28, 1 1 A.M., services in Houghton Memorial Chapel, ser- 
mon by Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., of Cambridge. 
7 P.M., vespers, special music. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Miss Taylor of the English Department lectured to the 
girls of Miss Church's and Miss Bytel's school on Beacon street, 
on May tenth. Her subject was "The Short Story." 

Miss Beulah Dix lectured to the English classes, Tuesday 
afternoon, May sixteenth, in College Hall Chapel, on the writing 
of plays. The lecture was of peculiar interest to college girls 
since Miss Dix used as her example her own play, "The Rose 
of Plymouth-Town," which many of us have seen, and which 
was originally written for college presentation, when Miss Dix 
was a student at Radcliffe. 

A reception was held, Saturday afternoon, May twentieth, by 
Mrs Cook and the faculty at Wood Cottage. 

The Alliance Francaise received in honor of Mademoiselle 
Morse, at the Zeta Alpha House, Monday afternoon, May 
twenty-second. 

President Hazard entertained the members of the choir at the 
President's House, Monday evening, May twenty-second. 

The subject of the lecture by Mr. Robert A. Woods, on 
May twenty-seventh, will be "Municipal Ownership." 

Dr. Barker and the students of the Eliot received on Monday, 
May twenty-second. 

Three purses have been found in Billings Hall. The owners 
may get them by going to Room C, Billings Hall. 



Exhibition of Students' Work in the Art Building. 



The annual exhibition of the work of students in the Depart- 
ment of Art is now open. A chance is thus given to see what 
has been going on throughout the year in studio and history of 
art courses. 

Each history of art course is represented in its laboratory work, 
by which even the unskilled in drawing may get getter ac- 
quainted with the great masterpieces of art. 

The courses represented show Freshman work in clay, char- 
coal and pencil, the sketches of the classes in history of sculpture 
and of painting, and the studio work of black and white, and 
color. 

The exhibition is unique this year in its extent, showing not 
only the regular academic/work but the development into the 
serious graduate study which the Department encourages. 
'Phis is illustrated by the architectural drawings of Miss Eliza J. 
Xewkirk, (Class 1900) who is now studying abroad at the end of 
her three years' graduate Fellowship in Art 



66 



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L. P. HOLLANDER <& CO. 

Young L,adies' Gowns, Coats and Wraps, 

Millinery, Hats, Underwear and Gloves. 

We call special attention to a Large Assortment of Dresses, made in our own workrooms for College and 

Street Wear, at very Reasonable Prices. 



202 to 216 Boylston Street and Park Square, Boston. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



I. 

At this time, when the student body are all concerned with 
making siginificant decisions with reference to their work for 
the coming year, the Free Press may well become the medium 
for some discussion of this important subject. 

Some tests which it seems to one member of the Faculty 
appropriate to apply before final choice of electives are here 
presented. It would be interesting if others, teachers and 
students, would take up this discussion. 

The first test usually applied is that of personal liking: — 
What do I most enjoy? This is a legitimate test, but perhaps 
one which should not be applied so exclusively in Sophomore 
and Junior as in Senior year. The same may be said of another 
like test, that of personal ability. It is satisfactory to get a 
grip on one's self by doing desirable things which are hard and 
downright work. 

Another important test is: — How much shall I specialize? 
It is a subject now before the educational world, and which an 
undergraduate should gravely consider. How great a proportion 
of time should be given to a chosen specialty, and how much to 
gaining that general culture which will all one's life serve to show 
the relation of one's special knowledge to knowledge in other 

departments? 

To many, the practical test will be a deciding one. What 
subjects, if I wish to teach, will be most in demand and will be 
called for together. Here it would often be wise to take expert 
advice early in one's course. 

When these tests have all been applied, and a narrow list of 
possible and equally desirable electives is left, it is well to take 
the whole life into consideration rather than narrowing the 
thought to the undergraduate years. One may well ask, ' ' What 
can I afford to leave until later years?" — for study will not end 
with college days. Is one likely to be where there will be fair op- 
portunity for modern language study in private classes, or where 
there will be fair library privileges, so that with knowledge of 
methods of work, with tools, one can continue literary work. The 
woman's clubs will take in the college women and look to them 
for leaders. Further, will there be future facilities for science 
studies, for which books do not suffice, but which must have 
laboratory and observatory, with their equipment of apparatus. 
This is certainly a legitimate and useful test to apply and one 
sometimes taken into thought too late. 

Finally, what are my friends going into? The most delightful 
memories of college days will be of the community of interest 
in books, of the happy hours spent in collaborating over the 
same experiment, so that, in its place, this test is surely proper. 

The occasion of this writing is the happening upon a paper 
containing some of Mr. Durant's famous sayings to the girls 
with whom he talked in halls and class rooms, of their work. 
The girls of to-day will be glad to hear of his ideals. 

Mr. Durant's remarks: 

"Take hard things, not always the so-called ladylike sub- 
jects." 

"American scholarship! It has hardly begun to exist. 
What has our country yet done for learning in comparison 
with what has been done in this same century in lands across 
the sea? We need learning in America and you girls must help 
to build it up." 

"Be reformers against the lies and frauds of easy, slipshod, 
smattering, so-called education." 

"Study the phenomena of nature, color, sound, the stars, the 
earth. I would rather the fountains of inspiration in the house 
were closed, than that the girls should cease to drink of those 
beneath the open sky." Sarah F. Whiting. 

II. 
We college girls all profess to love music; we "enthuse" over 
vespers and the college concerts. But what does music really 
mean to us? Do we really listen in enjoyment of the theme 
with understanding of the structure? Does music ever appeal 
to our intelligence? No; I believe we sentimentalize chiefly. 
In the gloom of the vesper service we let our thoughts roam 
luxuriously; the great sonorous tones of the organ fascinate our 
senses, and we are unconscious that we are listening to Dvorak's 
American Symphony, except as the different movements creat 
new thoughts for interesting consideration. We love music, yes, 
but emotionally, sensuously, not intelligently. Cannot we 
educate ourselves to the proper attitude of appreciation? 

H. L. D., 1905. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 

An invitation is extended to any white merchant outside of New York City, 
or their representative, whose name appears in Bradstreet's or Dunn's Com- 
mercial Agency Book, to accept the hospitality of our Hotel for three days 
without charge. Usual rates, apartment with private bath, S3. 00 per day and 
up, without meals. Parlor, Bedroom and Private Bath, $35.00 per week and 
up, with meals for two. New York Merchants and Editors are requested to 
call the attention of their out-of-town buyers and subscribers to this adver- 
tisement. 

GALLATIN HOTEL, 70 W. 46th St., New York City. 

Our NEW SHIRTINGS are received, 
For Ladies' and Misses' Waists and Tub Dresses. 

SHIRT-WAISTS. 

A large variety of patterns; quality of fabric and work right, 
with a certainty of being fitted. Prices from $3.50 to $15.00. 
Ladies' Hosiery 

50 cents to $750 per pair. 
Ladies' Neckwear, Stocks and Belts 
Fownes' Heavy Walking Gloves 

Hand Sewn, $1.50 
Street and Dress Gloves 

In Tan, Black and White, $1.50 to $2.50 
Ladies' Storm Coats 

New Mannish Shapes, $15.00 to $35.00 
Blanket Wraps 

For Men, Women and Children, $2.75 to $50.00 
Paris Models of Corsets 

$3.00 to $25.00 

EVERY REQUISITE FOR GOLF AND TENNIS. 



NOYES BROS., 



Washington and Summer Sts., 
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Waists and Neckwear may be purchased at the Wellesley Inn. 

Hotel Manhattan, 

HAWK & WETHERBEE. 

Madison Avenue and 

Forty-Second Street, 

NEW YORK 

III. 

The following Free Press was klca ed before the last issue, but 
was held over because of lack of space. 

Wellesley prides herself on her college spirit and her courtesy 
towards each incoming class, but is it courtesy to interrupt a 
speech? No! Then is it courtesy to interrupt a class cheer? 
Nevertheless on the morning of May 3, even though 1908 waited 
for her turn after the Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores, twice 
sin- was silenced by a volley of "Sh-h-h-h-s! " since another 
class seemed to consider the Freshman cheer too insignificant 
to count. Nor was this the only time that 1908 has been slighted 
during the past winter. If this is courtesy, if this is college 
spirit, by all means let us change it before the coming of 1909. 

T. H., C. S., '08. 



COLLEGE NEWS 




umlptygmm 




si 



3684 



CORRECT DRESS 
FOR WOMEN. 



Original and Correctly Fashioned Apparel. 

Suits, Gowns, Waists, Coats and Skirts 

Every woman appreciates the fact that to be really well dressed 
means to be original and to preserve a note of distinct individ- 
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within the bounds of reason — is the problem that we are help- 
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commonplace things are excluded. By unremitting effort we 
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Summer Booklet ready, mailed on request, mail orders promptly filled. 

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20 West 23d St. opposite Riftn Ave. Hotel New York 



PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



(WITH CONTRITE APOLOGIES TO WALT WHITMAN.) 

Murmurings and groanings lifted in ear-splitting tumult, I hear, 
Grating cocophony, sibilant rcboations, 

Footsteps ascending in ponderous jolts and vibrating concus- 
sions, 
Waves and swelling volumes of cloud-crashing dissonance, 
The ghigging and plashing of waters rolling and mixing, 
(Or is it the sluicing of tears? the measureless swirl and down- 
showering of human tear-drops?) 
I see, I visualize, I behold the chortling and vorticose congloba- 

tions of classes, 
Mournfully, slowly, they roll toward the gyrating maelstrom, 
(Hark! 'tis the drawing of rooms in second floor center)! 




CINEST PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE OVER 
r THE ONLY " DOUBLE TRACK " ROUT! 
BETWEEN BOSTON, ALBANY AND THB 
WEST. 



A. S. HAIVSOIN, 

General Paitenger Agent. 



CARE OF THE GROUNDS. 



Mr. Woods has sent in another urgent appeal for a little 
more care about the college grounds. The two things of which 
he complains most are carelessness in throwing papers about 
the grounds, and the thoughtlessness which the girls display in 
wearing paths along the sides of the walks, when they can use 
the walks equally well. It takes one man, whose services are 
much needed on the athletic grounds and elsewhere, an entire 
day each week, simply to pick up papers. This reacts on the 
girls themselves, for a definite amount of time is thus taken 
away from work which goes for their direct pleasure. As for 
wearing paths in the grass, the walks leading to Stone Hall and 
to the east lodge have been broadened two feet by continual 
use. There is no excuse for this; the .walks are now in good 
condition, and can be used without inconvenience to anyone. 



Boston and Maine Railroad. 

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Southwest. 

Pullman Palace or Sleeping Cars on all through lines. For tick- 
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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., 

JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS, 
BOSTON. 

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TOellcsles 

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10 Grove St., Wellesley. 

R. F. EVANS, 

Painter and Decorator. 

Paper Hanging: and Tinting. 

Bit flDail ®rt>crs promptly attent>e& to. 

458 Washington Street, Welleslej. 

H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, 
Stationery, Etc. 

Wright & Ditson Sporting Goods. 
Waban Block, Wellesley Sq. 

James Korntved, 

Ladies' and Gent's Custom Tailor 

SHAW BLOCK, ROOM i 
WELLESLEY SQUARE. 
Special attention paid to Pressing 
and Cleaning. 

R. DIEHL, JR., 

Livery and Boarding Stable, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Baggage Transferred to and from 
Station. Meet all trains. Orders 
promptly attended to. Hacks for 
Funerals and Parties. 

Telephone No. 16-2. 

New York and Boston 
Calcium Light Co. 

102 TJtica Street, Boston. 
Tel. 673 Oxford. 

F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers In 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mast. 

Telephon* No. 16-4. 

STURTEVANT 4 HALEY 

BEEP AIND 
SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 

Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON. 

Telephone 933 Richmond. 



FORENSICS VS. DEBATES. 



The fact that the end of this year's work is nearly here was 
made evident last Wednesday morning by the appearance of 
the Junior Forensic and Debate classes as they filed into chapel. 
The members of the debating classes were dressed in deepest 
black, symbolic of their mourning over work as yet unfinished, 
while those who had elected Forensics were jubilant in white, 
though their hair was silvered by all-night work over the last 
forensic, which most of them carried, neatly roled, to be de- 
posited in the English cabinet after chapel. When the services 
were over the Juniors formed in line in front of the chapel and 
marched up around the circle to the north door of College Hall 
where they cheered and sang songs composed for the occasion : 

FOR FORENSICS. 

Tune—' ' U pidee. ' ' 
To-day our long year's work is done, 

Tra-la-la, Tra-la-la! 
And now we mean to have some fun, 

Tra-la-la-la-la. 
We've piled our papers out of sight, 
And robed ourselves in dresses white, 

Tra-la-la, etc. 

FOR DEBATES. 

We've argued long and argued sore, 

Oh, dear me! Oh, dear me! 
And yet we're asked to argue more. 

Oh, dear me, dear me! 
We've talked on railroads, Russians, raids, 
On books and strikes and college maids. 
Don't ask us to talk some more! 

Oh, dear me, dear me! 

FOR DEBATERS. 

Tune — "Coming Thro' the Rye.'' 
Madam Chairman and all members 

Of English Fifteen, 
I am here to prove exactly what 

I say and mean. 
I have found my special issue, 

I have made my brief. 
How then, in such circumstances 

Could I come to grief? 

I can manage my opponent, 

If she's not too wise. 
I can bring some refutation 

That will cause surprise. 
Surely it is plainly proven 

I shall win to-day, 
For whate'er I haven't time for 

My colleague will say. 



WELLESLEY DISCOUNT 



Butterfield's 



Bookshop, 



59 Bromfield St., Boston 

(Basement of the Paddock Building, Cor. Tremont St.) 
Tel. Main 3792. 



C. W. HURLL, 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN, 

120 Tremont Street, 
Opp. Park St. Church 
George P. Hurll, Mgr. 
Rooms 331-332 Phillips Bldg. 

ELEVATOR BOSTON 

John A. Morgan & Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

DENTIST, 

Dr. Edward E. Henry, 

Gator's JBlocft, TKIlelleslefi 

Telephone 113- Wellesley. 
R. M. PORTER, 

Hardware Store 

Just received new lot Kitchen 
Ware, including good assortment 
of Aluminum Ware. 

Typewriting done at this office 
Taylor's Block. 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers In 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

Qassius /T). JJall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Are., Natlck, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 



Cafedes 
Invalides 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMN/C NOTES. 

(In addition to items about Alumnae, this column will occa- 
sionally contain notes about members of the Faculty, past and 
present, and former students.) 

Addresses received: 

Mrs Mary Russell Norton, 1894, 147 Winchester avenue. 
Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Miss Louise Cook, 1894, 585 Hancock street, Brooklyn, New 
York- 
Miss Edna V. Moffett, Instructor in History, has been ap- 
pointed to the President White travelling Fellowship in Euro- 
pean History, of Cornell University, and will spend next year 
abroad in travel and study. 

Mrs Alice Ames Winter's (1886) novel, "The Prize to the 
Hardy," is noticed among the book reviews in Life, May 4, 
with a favorable criticism. 

A book of stories, "At the Foot of the Rockies," by Miss 
Carter Goodloe, 1889, is just coming out under Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons. The stories deal with the white man and the Indian 
of the Northwest ; their social life and the experiences of ranch- 
ers and officers. 

Miss Candace Stimson, 1892, is making the passage on her 
father's yacht, the Fleur de Lys, in the race for the Kaiser's 
cup. It is stated that she is the only lady attempting the trip. 

Miss Helen M. Kelsey. 1895, spent Sunday, May 7, at the 
college. In answer to enquiries about the Fifth Avenue Agency 
of which she is manager, Miss Kelsey reports an increasing 
business and a large number of good schools on the list, which 
are constantly seeking experienced teachers. Miss Kelsey. 
Miss Lillian Brandt, 1895, ar *d Miss Edith Young, 1900, have 
recently taken an apartment on Columbia Heights in Brooklyn, 
where they are going to keep house together. 

Miss Isabella H. Fiske, 1896. has recently written the li- 
bretto of an operetta entitled "The Prince of the Rubies," 
which is to be given by the girls of the Shadow Club at the 
Congregational Church. Wellesley Hills, May 20. 

Miss Florence E. Hastings, 1897, expects to return in July 
to this country from Berlin, Germany, where she has been 
studying this past year, and will spend the summer with her 
aunt. Mrs Maria L. Ford of Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Miss Katharine Bullock Scott, 1900, has been studying medi- 
cine at the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, the year 
1903-1904- making the third year of her course. 

Miss Edna L'Fstrange Leward, 1900. has been teaching geog- 
raphy and history in the Montclair Military Academy, a large 
boys' school near her home. 

Miss Martha Cornelia Shaw, 1900, went abroad in June, 1900, 
to spend at least eighteen months. Her address is Dresden 
Bank, 39 Pragerstrasse, Dresden. 

Miss Cora L. Butler, T904, who has been teaching Mathe- 
matics at the Yeatman High School of St. Louis this year, has 
been elected Vice- President of the St. Louis Association of 
Science and Mathematics Teachers, for the next year. 

Miss Lillian Macdonald, 1904, will be in Wellesley for Tree 
Day and will remain until after Commencement. 

Miss Lotta Deane, formerly of 1906, is acting as critic in the 
Primary Department of the State Normal School. Fredonia, 
New York. 

The Alumnae Editor will be glad to publish short notices in 
regard to Commencement arrangements made by classes having 
reunions. 

ENGAGEMENTS ANNOUNCED. 

Miss Grace Rickey, 1893, to Mr. Allen B. Linn of South Bend, 
Indiana. 

Miss Portia Washington, 1901-1902, to Mr. Charles W. Wood, 
Beloit College, 1895. 

BIRTHS. 

In Lowell, Massachusetts, March 28. 1905, a son, Victor Stod- 
dard, to Mrs. Carrie Hardwick Bigelow, 1893. 
DEATHS. 

In Beloit, Wisconsin, May 3. 1905. Mrs. Ellen Chapin Porter, 
mother of Mary I. Porter, 1889- 1890. 

Beauty and Economy ! 

Strong Points 

In Any Decorative Haterial. 

IN DENNISON'S CREPE PAPER 

Both arc Combined to Highest Degree. 

DENNISON MFG. CO. 

26 FranKlin Street, Boston 



Cross patch, cross patch, 
Don't sit by the fire and spin, 
But take a train and call on Hatch 
And bring your neighbors in. 

HATCH 

Orientalist and Rug Merchant, 
-43 and -4S Summer St., Boston. 



Every Requisite for a 

Dainty Xuncb 

at 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., 

55 to 61 Slimmer Street, 

( Only one block from Washington St.) 

The Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume. 

COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
.Makers of the 

Caps, Gowns and Hoods 

to Wellesley, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, Bryn 
Mawr, Barnard, Woman's College of Baltimore, 
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Univ. of Pa., Dartmouth, Brown, 
Williams, Amherst, Colorado College, Stanford and the others. 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES. 

Illustrated bulletin and samples on request. (A. W. Stocking, 
Wellesley, 1902, in charge of correspondence.) 

New Hotel Bellevue 




EUROPEAN PLAN 



CENTRAL LOCATION 



BEACON STREET, near TREMONT 

boston, mass. 

Harvey & Wood 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION NOTES. 



At the regular meeting of the Christian Association, held 
Thursday evening, May eighth, the annual reports of the various 
committees were read and approved. The membership of the 
Association is larger in proportion to the number of girls in 
college than it was last year, and the reports of the Bible and 
mission study classes showed a great increase of activity. All 
the reports were both satisfactory and encouraging. 

The officers of the Association for 1905-6 have been elected 
as follows: 

President, Faith B. Sturtevant, 1006. 

Vice-President, Lottie Hartwell, 1906. 

Recording Secretary, Kathcrinc Hazcltinc, 1908. 

Corresponding Secretary, Gertrude Cate, 1907. 

Treasurer, Helen Goddard, 1907. 

Chairman of Missionary Committee, Miss Kendrick. 

Chairman of Religious Meetings Committee, Miss Gamble. 

Chairman of Bible Study Committee, Mary Patchin, 1906. 

Chairman of Mission Study Committee, Florence Plummer, 
1907. 

Chairman of Social Committee, Winifred Vandervoort, 1907. 

Chairman of General Aid Committee, Emma Bixby, 1907. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Miss Chamberlain of the Department of Elocution will give 
a reading of Bernard Shaw's well-known play, "Candida," in 
Billings Hall, on Friday. May 26, at 4.15. Miss Chamberlain 
has been most successful in her presentation of this much- 
discussed play, and it is felt that many will be glad to avail 
themselves of the unusual opportunity offered by this Wellesley 
reading, given at the request of the members of the Elocution 
classes. All members of the college arc invited 



THEATER NOTES. 



Holi.is-stkekt Theater — Miss Ellis Jeffreys in "London As- 

suran 
Park Theater — "Strongheart." 
Boston Theater — "The Earl and the Girl." 
Tremont Theater — Raymond Hitchcock in "The Yankee 

Consul." 

HERRIC K'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, NEAR BACK BAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Phone now 13*9, *33<> and *33I. 

Theatrical 'Wig's and MaKe-up, 

M. G. SLATTERY, 

226 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine, Opp. Majestic Theatre. 
WIGS, BEARDS, CURLS, To rent for Private Theatricals 

MOUSTACHES. Masquerades, Carnivals. 

Grease Paints, Eye Pencils, Powders, Rouges, Etc. 



Chickering Pianos 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 



FOR CATALOGUE 



Chickering §f Sons 

PIANOFORTE MAKERS 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



MERCHANTS AND MINERS 
TRANSPORTATION CO. 

STEAMSHIP LINES 

FROM 

BOSTON and PROVIDENCE 

To NORFOLK, BALTIMORE, RICHMOND, 
WASHINGTON. SAVANNAH and all points 
South and West. Ticket includes meals and 
stateroom accommodations on steMner. Four 
sailings from Boston, three sailings from Prov- 
idence each week. 

For advertising matter, Bailings, rates, tick- 
ets, etc.. address 

A. M. GRAHAM, Agent, Boston, Mass. 
W. P. CORIA, Agent, Providence, R. I. 

J. C. WHITNEY, 2d V. P. & T. M. W. P. TUR- 
NER, G. P. A. General Offices, Baltimore, Md. 



McFADDEN, Ladies' Hatter 



Le Bon Ton 



Latest Styles from Paris and New York. 
167 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



Formerly 

507 Washington Street 

Cor. West Street 



Telephone 1291-2 Oxford 



E. T. SLATTERY CO. 

ARE SHOWING 

WALKING SUITS 

IN NEW SHARES AND FABRICS. 

Fine French Millinery and Neckwear. Marabout Boas and Muffs. 

154 and 155 Tremont Street.